About gDonna
The photo is my son and myself. Now days you can get a photo made to look old like this one. This photo was taken when this was the new look.

Harry S Truman was president when I was born and world war II had ended. I grew up in a time when lunch was put in a brown paper bag and a sandwich was wrapped with wax paper. There was no such thing as pantyhose, we wore stockings that attached to the rubbery clippy things that attached to the girdle. Convenience stores were not common and when we took a trip we packed a picnic basket because many places did not have fast food. Highways had places to pull over and stop, some with picnic tables. Read more ....
 

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Comments On Article: Days Of The Week

1,672 posts (admin)
Mon Jul 08, 24 6:08 PM CST

If you would like to share your comments for article Days of the week, this is where to do it! 

Click the Reply To This Topic button below to post yours.

M
20 posts
Mon Jul 08, 24 6:48 PM CST

I have days of the week jobs. Monday is laundry, change beds, clean the downstairs, and bake bread. Every day is a specific day’s work. That way I can keep this big old house relatively clean. Yard and garden work I do around the weather or early of the morning before my day’s chores and it is still cool. My sewing, knitting, quilting, weaving and so forth are done of the evening. Bed time is 10; wake up is with the sun so it varies. It’s nice to have each day set with chores as it makes my life a lot easier! 

S
20 posts
Mon Jul 08, 24 7:26 PM CST

I have always washed my sheets and laundry on Monday. Seeing all the laundry swaying on the line brings me such contentment. Ironing and house chores that weren’t finished on Monday go to Tuesday . I don’t have a dedicated days to do all the other chores. I will have to work on that. As far as making gifts , I love to knit socks. I knit two pair to send out to my daughter for her birthday. I have embroidered dishcloths before but they are pretty worn out . So I look forward to making a new set. I can’t wait to see others projects. This journey through 1940 has been a lot of fun . I loved reading about the washeterias . I had no idea the had anything like that in the past. Thank you Donna for sharing and giving us glimpses of the past

Edited Mon Jul 08, 24 7:33 PM by Sheri R
Sheri
T
48 posts
Mon Jul 08, 24 9:28 PM CST

I'm glad you posted the photo of the summer union suit, because when you wrote about it before, I pictured longjohns that were just a lightweight fabric.  It makes more sense now.

My work schedule doesn't really allow for doing  housework on the side every day, but I do appreciate the concept behind it.  I guess I will be a busy working woman in this study too, as some of my ancestors were in 1940 (though in a very different job!)

Speaking of working women in the 1940's. . .  Do you (or does anyone reading this) know how to tie your hair up in a scarf with a little knot in front, like Rosie the Riveter?  I've seen photos of my great-grandmother and one of my great-grandfather's sisters wearing their hair like that, and was trying to do it, but couldn't even figure out what size and shape of scarf to start with, or what the first step would be.  If anyone knows, instructions would be greatly appreciated:)


Edited Mon Jul 08, 24 9:29 PM by Tea S
C
4 posts
Mon Jul 08, 24 9:41 PM CST
Tea S wrote:

I'm glad you posted the photo of the summer union suit, because when you wrote about it before, I pictured longjohns that were just a lightweight fabric.  It makes more sense now.

My work schedule doesn't really allow for doing  housework on the side every day, but I do appreciate the concept behind it.  I guess I will be a busy working woman in this study too, as some of my ancestors were in 1940 (though in a very different job!)

Speaking of working women in the 1940's. . .  Do you (or does anyone reading this) know how to tie your hair up in a scarf with a little knot in front, like Rosie the Riveter?  I've seen photos of my great-grandmother and one of my great-grandfather's sisters wearing their hair like that, and was trying to do it, but couldn't even figure out what size and shape of scarf to start with, or what the first step would be.  If anyone knows, instructions would be greatly appreciated:)


I would like to know about tying head scarves.  I can’t get it right.  

C
4 posts
Mon Jul 08, 24 9:46 PM CST

I learned so much about laundry especially sending it out.  
I have always loved days of the week towels.  I have lots of embroidery designs, vintage.  I need to give up knitting in the summer and work on lighter weight towels.  
thank you for the information.  

l
5 posts
Mon Jul 08, 24 11:24 PM CST

I have always worked and as a nurse my schedule was constantly changing. When I got a Monday thru Friday job, I did housework & laundry on the weekend. I often "batch cooked" on the weekend for the coming week. My mother was widowed young & she was a nurse too. We children did housework on the weekend. I suppose you adapt your schedule to fit your circumstances. I liked to do laundry, clean, cook on the weekend to get things in order for the work week. Then all I had to do was get my clothing out & make my lunch for the next day. My grandmother never worked outside the home. I don't remember that she used a particular schedule, but she got everything done. 

A
16 posts
Mon Jul 08, 24 11:53 PM CST

I just finished watching a video about an English family who lived like 1940.  England's situation in 1940 was much more dire than in the USA.  However, people in this country were well aware of the situation in England.  Fortunately, things never became as bad here even after our entry into WW II.  I would say 1940 was probably the last year of innocence before December 1941.  

Living life in a 1940s house (youtube.com)

T
14 posts
Tue Jul 09, 24 8:38 AM CST

Thea S I was going to post this before but wasn't sure if anyone would want it and then you asked the question! Hope this helps.

Attached Photos

J
11 posts
Tue Jul 09, 24 9:06 AM CST

I love reading about everyone's schedules! I work at a plant nursery in the spring and summer, and I'm also a part-time professional writer, so my home schedule must fit around those responsibilities.

Saturday- Laundry and market day.  Afterward, I go to the farmer's market and grocery store for the week's groceries. It's also library day, as the library is right next to the farmer's market!

Sunday - Cleaning and baking day.  I bake at least two treats/snacks a week as we try to avoid ultra-processed food. This is also the day I make anything time consuming we may need for meals that week, like fresh pasta or a farmhouse cheese. I might do some canning or food dehydration, depending on the garden and market offerings. If it was the week I purchase the month's meat, I will divide it up into portions and either boil or bake a chicken to portion out for the freezer. Cleaning is easy since it's only adults in the house these days and we are all fairly tidy and we all pitch in, it only takes to clean. I also put away the laundry from the line (we wear few things that need ironing, as long as they are line dried). 

M-F- I work until about 3pm most days. Afternoons and evenings are dedicated to gardening,  food preservation in summer, sewing projects and mending, reading, research on the future home and property we are saving up for, and handwork like embroidery and knitting. I keep a running list of these types of tasks, and try to pick one or two that I can handle with post-work energy levels to work on most days. For the lowest energy evenings, I can always find the energy to crank out an item or two from my mending basket or to stitch together a few squares for the scrap quilt I am (slowly) hand sewing. I'm great at sitting, but not so great at sitting and doing nothing :)

N
2 posts
Tue Jul 09, 24 9:49 AM CST

I like to embroider stamped tea towels. I gift them as gifts to my grandkids, at wedding showers, as thank you gifts etc. It is a great pass time.

T
48 posts
Tue Jul 09, 24 10:01 AM CST

Tandi S.,

Thanks so much for posting that!  I had tried to Google it before, but could never find anything, probably because I didn't know they called it a turban.  Much appreciated:)

J
64 posts
Tue Jul 09, 24 10:08 AM CST

When my kids were very small I stayed at home with them about 3 years.  While I was home, I created a housework notebook that had daily chores such as dishes, weekly chores such as dusting (Tuesdays), laundry (Mondays) and baking (Saturdays), monthly chores such as washing the shower curtain and the windows' inside panes, quarterly chores such as defrost the refrigerator (that dates me) and clean the oven, bi-annual chores such as changing out storm windows and window screens (which also dates me), and yearly chores such as going through receipts, statements and tax information, tossing what wasn't needed.  I left Sundays open for rest.  It worked well for me in those days.  Now with a full time job and a long commute, I use the Fly Lady system and prep meals ahead on the weekends. 

M
14 posts
Tue Jul 09, 24 8:01 PM CST
Ann W wrote:

I just finished watching a video about an English family who lived like 1940.  England's situation in 1940 was much more dire than in the USA.  However, people in this country were well aware of the situation in England.  Fortunately, things never became as bad here even after our entry into WW II.  I would say 1940 was probably the last year of innocence before December 1941.  

Living life in a 1940s house (youtube.com)

Thanks for linking that, I loved watching it! Some of the things they said made me laugh so hard, especially when she was getting ready for bed in the beginning..lol

M
2 posts
Wed Jul 10, 24 5:00 AM CST
Ann W wrote:

I just finished watching a video about an English family who lived like 1940.  England's situation in 1940 was much more dire than in the USA.  However, people in this country were well aware of the situation in England.  Fortunately, things never became as bad here even after our entry into WW II.  I would say 1940 was probably the last year of innocence before December 1941.  

Living life in a 1940s house (youtube.com)

I’ve had this on DVD for years, it is so good! I like to watch it periodically. I love how it really changed the family. The children would be adults now; It would be neat to see a follow up to know if the changes lasted for them

G
307 posts (admin)
Wed Jul 10, 24 12:05 PM CST

Grandma Donna Wrote, Once again, I am so happy that everyone is communicating with each other and bringing into the study interesting information that you have to add.  I take a chance keeping it open like this for anyone to add information so if you ever see anything inappropriate, please contact me by email as soon as possible.  So far it has been wonderful and interesting information and I read each and every comment but I do have to sleep at times. :)  What I did on the video is I saved it to my computer to watch parts of it as I have the time, a very good look at this time in history. 

This is good, we will continue on into 1940, depending on where you live some of you are already at war and doing rations.  In 1940, we would not have known where we were heading, only where we have been.  Grandma Donna

J
11 posts
Wed Jul 10, 24 1:22 PM CST

A lot of women were doing war work in 1940, taking on men’s jobs, joining the uniformed services, joining the Women’s Voluntary Service, for all of the extra work which was needed. Everyone was doing First Aid Courses, joining working parties and fund raising. Many were working in the new canteens. Shopping using ration coupons meant a lot of time waiting in queues. Housework has had to be fitted in when possible. 

I have been watching the weather forecast all of the year to do the washing when there will be a gap in the rain to dry it outside. It doesn’t feel like summer. I have been glad of my porridge for breakfast, and have got used to it made with water instead of milk, and we have our pot of tea without sugar. 

The Minister of Food, Lord Woolton reminds us to use just one teaspoon per person, “And none for the pot.” It is strong enough to top up the pot with boiling water for a second cup.”

I have been reading  The Times, and thought the British wartime adverts might interest you.

My reading this week is the Mrs Tim books by D. E. Stevenson, based on her diaries as the wife of an officer. In Mrs Tim Carries On, 1941, the heroine's husband has gone missing on the retreat to Dunkirk. 


Attached Photos

Edited Wed Jul 10, 24 2:14 PM by Janet W
23 posts
Wed Jul 10, 24 2:30 PM CST
Tea S wrote:

I'm glad you posted the photo of the summer union suit, because when you wrote about it before, I pictured longjohns that were just a lightweight fabric.  It makes more sense now.

My work schedule doesn't really allow for doing  housework on the side every day, but I do appreciate the concept behind it.  I guess I will be a busy working woman in this study too, as some of my ancestors were in 1940 (though in a very different job!)

Speaking of working women in the 1940's. . .  Do you (or does anyone reading this) know how to tie your hair up in a scarf with a little knot in front, like Rosie the Riveter?  I've seen photos of my great-grandmother and one of my great-grandfather's sisters wearing their hair like that, and was trying to do it, but couldn't even figure out what size and shape of scarf to start with, or what the first step would be.  If anyone knows, instructions would be greatly appreciated:)


Hello Tea, When I had to shave my hair during chemo, one of my daughters wrapped my head that way. I am sure there must be a tutorial on YouTube. There is so much to learn there.

Enjoy!

Laura of Harvest Lane Cottage

The LORD bless you!
Laura of Harvest Lane Cottage
http://harvestlanecottage.com
23 posts
Wed Jul 10, 24 2:46 PM CST

Socks are my go to for family members and close friends. My husband has made a big deal out of telling my kids just how long it takes and calls his socks $300 socks since he wears size 13 (as do all the men in my family).

Attached Photos

The LORD bless you!
Laura of Harvest Lane Cottage
http://harvestlanecottage.com
A
1 posts
Wed Jul 10, 24 5:08 PM CST

I have enjoyed your 1940's study.My husband and I are trying to live a much simpler and slower life.I am new to your blog so I have much reading to do! :) Thank you for sharing  and teaching the ways of the past. Have a blessed week. 

Angela

G
19 posts
Thu Jul 11, 24 1:07 PM CST

I think I have the same expression on my face as your poor kitten as I do my chores too!  I only do basic chores during the week, cooking, laundry, airing the house and general tidying, and save my cleaning for Saturday morning--the one time I have the house to myself.  If for some reason my kids are at home and not at their usual activities, I put them to work too (the four year old loves this, the fourteen year old not so much).  

G
307 posts (admin)
Thu Jul 11, 24 3:41 PM CST

Grandma Donna Wrote:  Angela B, Welcome to the forum and to the blog.  I am very happy you are here and I am sure others are as well.  My blog is mostly how to live a sensible life and we do history studies to learn about how our generations before us did things without all the modern items of today.  Happy reading.... Grandma Donna

W
19 posts
Wed Jul 17, 24 9:13 PM CST
Laura of Harvest Lane wrote:

Socks are my go to for family members and close friends. My husband has made a big deal out of telling my kids just how long it takes and calls his socks $300 socks since he wears size 13 (as do all the men in my family).

Laura, would you be able to share your sock pattern or a link to it?  I've made socks a few times but I'm not very good at it.  I would like to do better so I can give them a gifts.  Also, my son wears size 14 and I don't know how to adjust the pattern for different sizes.  Any help you share is very much appreciated.  

Jacki

23 total messages
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