About gDonna
The photo is my son and myself. Now days you can get a photo made to look old like this one. This photo was taken when this was the new look.

Harry S Truman was president when I was born and world war II had ended. I grew up in a time when lunch was put in a brown paper bag and a sandwich was wrapped with wax paper. There was no such thing as pantyhose, we wore stockings that attached to the rubbery clippy things that attached to the girdle. Convenience stores were not common and when we took a trip we packed a picnic basket because many places did not have fast food. Highways had places to pull over and stop, some with picnic tables. Read more ....
 

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Comments On Article: Aprons, Knitted Bandages And Moving Again

1,672 posts (admin)
Thu Jun 27, 24 12:33 PM CST

If you would like to share your comments for article Aprons, Knitted bandages and Moving Again, this is where to do it! 

Click the Reply To This Topic button below to post yours.

J
64 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 1:33 PM CST

I had learned to knit in junior high Home Ec. class, then forgot how.  I started again a couple of years ago, but with my long work days and a family member to care for, I kept putting it aside, forgetting where I was, trying to remember how to make the stitches, you name it.  I'm going to try again as soon as my day frees up just a bit.  I want to make wash cloths and dish cloths, which have to be incredibly simple to make, but now I think I'll add bandages.  I never before thought about the fact that they can be sterilized.  How much nicer than the disposables that add to our trash.

My parents married in September of 1939, so I'm also interested in 1940.  Their first "home" was a 9'x12' bedroom rented in a widow's private home, and they shared her kitchen and bathroom.  My dad worked before the war at a furniture store so he bought two thick glass "alabaster" lamps for their newlywed "home."  I have those lamps in my bedroom today.  They are re-wired and in perfect shape.  I love them.  

F
3 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 2:38 PM CST

What a lovely plan. I would love to join in. Since I have several physical limitations and am an avid reader I will read books from 1940 and watch movies from 1940 if I can find them. 

Best Selling Books of 1940
  • How Green Was My Valley by Richard Llewellyn.
  • Kitty Foyle by Christopher Morley.
  • Mrs. Miniver by Jan Struther.
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway.
  • The Nazarene by Sholem Asch.
  • Stars on the Sea by F. Van Wyck Mason.
  • Oliver Wiswell by Kenneth Roberts.
  • The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.
Top Movies of 1940
Boom Town
The Great Dictator
Rebecca
Northwest Mounted Police
The Philadelphia Story
Strike Up the Band
Northwest Passage
Andy Hardy Meets Debutante
The Fighting 69th
Santa Fe Trail

Question: Will we end 1940 on January 1, 2025 or continue to July 1, 2025?

I will keep you posted on my book and movie progress. 
Best wishes, 

Florenc

G
307 posts (admin)
Thu Jun 27, 24 2:59 PM CST

Grandma Donna wrote, Joan S, I will post directions for a very nice wash cloth that was knitted for the soldiers to send overseas during the war.  I have knitted these for home use.

Florence M, thank you for the book and movie list.  Going to the movies was very popular during the 1930s and 1940's.  People went often since there was no television.  I was very surprised how often they went when I started reading diaries during these years. The cost was very low to go since they had so many people going. Yes, keep us posted on your book and movie progress.  Now I want popcorn!

J
11 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 3:10 PM CST

I like reading about the 1940s. We are blessed by the Mass Observation Archive, a project which encouraged people to respond to questions about social events, to record what people were saying, and to keep diaries.  

I like the novels of the time, with the little snippets of what life was like. I collect Wartime recipe books, “Dig for Victory, gardening books, and books on, “ Make Do and Mend,” and Utility Clothing. We have got used to our 1940’s rations, it is much the same as the food I knew in the Austerity 50s and early 60s. 

My parents met at school in Wales, because at the first bombing in Birmingham, and my father was evacuated to live with his aunt. Mum’s father was on Minesweepers, Dad joined the Royal Navy as soon as he could, and Mum became a Nurse, her War Work. 

It doesn’t seem so long ago, my parents’ generation, their War, which made them grow up quickly, take responsibility, and do their bit. 


G
307 posts (admin)
Thu Jun 27, 24 3:20 PM CST

Grandma Donna wrote, Janet W, I have never read or heard of the Mass Observation Archive.  I looked it up on google and this is very interesting!  I agree, it does not seem so long ago.  Thank you for commenting.

L
50 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 3:21 PM CST
Florence M wrote:

What a lovely plan. I would love to join in. Since I have several physical limitations and am an avid reader I will read books from 1940 and watch movies from 1940 if I can find them. 

Best Selling Books of 1940
  • How Green Was My Valley by Richard Llewellyn.
  • Kitty Foyle by Christopher Morley.
  • Mrs. Miniver by Jan Struther.
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway.
  • The Nazarene by Sholem Asch.
  • Stars on the Sea by F. Van Wyck Mason.
  • Oliver Wiswell by Kenneth Roberts.
  • The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.
Top Movies of 1940
Boom Town
The Great Dictator
Rebecca
Northwest Mounted Police
The Philadelphia Story
Strike Up the Band
Northwest Passage
Andy Hardy Meets Debutante
The Fighting 69th
Santa Fe Trail

Question: Will we end 1940 on January 1, 2025 or continue to July 1, 2025?

I will keep you posted on my book and movie progress. 
Best wishes, 

Florenc

Rebecca was in 1940 !?  That was creepy. ???? (I read the book.)


G. Donna, 

You are such an inspiration.  It is fun that you chose a year that coincides with this year.  I remember when you went and "met" the little boy who got hit by the car on the day you were studying.  Though very sad, what a strong connection with the past.  I don't think I will be studying 1940, but will certainly follow along and maybe even find and share things along the way.  One thing about 40 over 17 is that you will have many more recipes to choose from.

Oh and Laura is a fabulous knitter isn't she?

Have a wonderful final weekend in 1917  ????

Lady Locust

G
307 posts (admin)
Thu Jun 27, 24 3:30 PM CST

Grandma Donna Wrote, Lady L,  yes Laura is very talented in knitting, what she does amazes me.  I am not sure where in time we are this weekend Lol, haven't thought about that other than I guess we have just arrived into 1940.  We actually plan on going back to the cemetery very soon to visit Billy's grave and take flowers for his vase.  (Heart)

A
16 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 4:54 PM CST

I don't know if you are familiar with the homemaking radio shows very popular during the 30's, 40's and into the 50's.  These were especially beloved by farm wives.  The lady who broadcast the daily program Kitchen-Klatter was named Leanna Driftmier.  The program was actually broadcast from her home on KMA radio out of Shenandoah, Iowa. 

My grandmother subscribed to the Kitchen-Klatter Magazine which provided information on what the Driftmier family was doing, recipes, household hints and other information.  I'm not sure if this was a weekly or monthly publication.  If you could get your hands on Kitchen-Klatter Magazine or recordings of the program, it would provide you with a wealth of information.   I never heard the program, but my grandmother shared a few copies of Kitchen-Klatter Magazine with me which included pictures of various family members.

Even into the 1950's farm wives were quite isolated.  Mostly they were home doing chores with a trip to town on Saturday night to "trade" and to church on Sunday.  The trading was taking eggs or cream to the grocery store and then getting credit to buy groceries.  Almost always the egg money was considered to be the wife's.  

The sharing of the Driftmier family was very complete and personal so that listeners felt like the Driftmiers were close friends or neighbors.

I would hope that somewhere there are recordings available and microfiche of the magazine.   

C
3 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 5:27 PM CST

It will be fun to follow along on your next adventure back in time to 1940.  I read with interest the comment by Ann W. This is the start page in the collections at Iowa State University For Kitchen-Klatter beginning in 1940.


https://digitalcollections.lib.iastate.edu/islandora/object/isu%3AKitchenKlatter_16018#page/1/mode/2up

It’s wonderful that so many resources are available digitally.  Enjoy!


Carol



G
307 posts (admin)
Thu Jun 27, 24 5:41 PM CST

Grandma Donna wrote, Carol C, thank you for finding the link for us, very helpful and wonderful we can read this at no cost!  Thank you

Edited Thu Jun 27, 24 5:41 PM by Grandma Donna
J
11 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 5:53 PM CST
Grandma Donna wrote:

Grandma Donna wrote, Janet W, I have never read or heard of the Mass Observation Archive.  I looked it up on google and this is very interesting!  I agree, it does not seem so long ago.  Thank you for commenting.

Nella Last wrote a diary for Mass Observation, parts of it have been published in three volumes, starting with Nella Last’s War. She wrote frequently about the meals she cooked on her small budget and the limited rations, keeping the home and garden and hens, worrying about her sons and their friends, and her war work, sewing hospital clothes, toys for sick children, and working in a charity shop to send Red Cross parcels to Prisoners of War. 

I have started reading The Times newspapers from their archive. I began at 1st June 1940. The Army is being evacuated from the beach at Dunkirk, the Garrison at Calais is to stay to defend them. (I watched the film, Their Darkest Hour. ) Among the grim news is a list of the officers and crew of a ship which was sunk. At home there is a reminder to send in the postcards promptly to receive the next food ration book. 

Edited Thu Jun 27, 24 5:56 PM by Janet W
H
5 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 5:58 PM CST

Hi Donna,

It's been a 'minute', as folks now say.  I'm so glad you are sharing and encouraging us to learn something. I am learning as I'm getting older, learning is great for the brain.

Just and fyi for your bandages, there are a few organizations (I think D.O.V.E fund is one of them) that are looking for folds who knit or crochet and will send them in for Lepers. While 95% of lepracy has been healed, there are still colonies in 2 countries and they are considered outcast. It's been a long time since I have looked into it, but just doing a quick Goodle search, I think they still collect them.  Just in case you wanted to really get going with crocheting them :-)

I LOVE your Jadite tea cup.  

Sending blessings, 

Dee


Q
1 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 7:18 PM CST

Hi Donna.  I have read your blog for a while now and wanted to say how much I enjoy reading about your history projects.  I always learn something new and when possible, try to incorporate some of the knowledge into my own life.   I always look forward to your posts as I find them calming in this chaotic, sometimes confusing world.  


Thanks


L
1 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 7:30 PM CST

love love love your blog..I am from Australia. been reading it for along time and also rhonda down to earth..I am going to follow along on your 1940s journey..love that era..your words speak to my heart

Edited Thu Jun 27, 24 7:31 PM by Lyn E
C
4 posts
Thu Jun 27, 24 10:02 PM CST

I use to reply to your blog and learned so much.  You are a great inspiration.  I love the tea cup, have one just like it.  My favorite piece is a coffee cup with a rooster.  The 1940s fascinate me.  My Mom graduated high school in 1949.  I enjoy your studies.  I am submerged for a short while away from this current world.  
Love all the comments.  The books and movies of the 40s are great. Checked on Kitchen Klatter.  Old home keeping magazines are a way for me to enjoy the time period.  I have them from 1865 to 1930.  
I am ready to learn, let the adventures begin

G
307 posts (admin)
Fri Jun 28, 24 11:18 AM CST

Grandma Donna wrote, Ann W, I did find an old recording of Evelyn Birkby on Kitchen Klatter, as soon as I read your comment I went off on the hunt. Lol  Thank you for sharing some good information.  https://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/islandora/object/ui%...

Janet W,  Thank you for the information, Nella's meals would be very interesting.  I am still trying to figure out how to maneuver my way through the information. 

Homemakers Heart D, I have read that too about the people with Lepracy needing bandages but I have never found out if that is still in todays time.  I feel that the way the economy is today that every home would benefit having the homemade knitted bandages.  I worked in wound care for many years and I could see the quality of bandages declining and the cost rising.  The Jadite  tea cup and saucer is my favorite tea cup. :)

QBC, Thank you for your comment, it helps me to keep going when I know that someone finds the post useful, that is my purpose.  (heart)

Lyn E, reminds me of Ann with an E of green gables. :)  Oh you are another kindred spirit, vintage minds gather.  lol

Cindy T,  I am happy to see your comment, it is like coming home being back in the 1940's.  I read Ann W's, comment and could not wait to go research the Kitchen Klatter.  There is such a difference in the way women kept their homes long ago and I feel that we need a dose of that now in this current world of today. (Heart) 


K
3 posts
Fri Jun 28, 24 9:17 PM CST

Hi all, I just love the 1940’s. I had just set up my Ration Book so I could start 1940’s “life” on July 1st also. Should be great fun to do together with others. I also have sewn outfits from 1940’s patterns to wear

G
307 posts (admin)
Fri Jun 28, 24 9:26 PM CST

Grandma Donna Wrote,  Hi Kimberly S, we are happy that you are going to be part of the study and living like 1940 and hopefully further on into the 40s. Much more to learn. :)

22 posts
Sat Jun 29, 24 4:27 AM CST

Thank you Grandma Donna for your great blogs, your a real treasure !!! and so encouraging to me :) I won't personally be participating in the 1940's study but will enjoy reading along with what everyone else is doing !

I was pleased you added a note about the recipe (was it hot milk cake??), where it wasn't 1 - 2 cups of milk. but actually 1/2 cup :) As I was reading it I thought, you can't just say one to two cups !! that would make a huge difference in the texture, and then I read your comment and laughed. That's good to know that the old recipes are written in a different way as I didn't know that.

Many blessings to you and have fun in the 1940's (I know you both will !!!) ~ Linda NZ  :) (The Little Homestead)

G
307 posts (admin)
Sat Jun 29, 24 6:18 AM CST

Grandma Donna Wrote Linda, yes, the older recipes are quite tricky at times and especially the ones that say a teacup of flour or lard the size of an egg.  I actually have molded a egg shape of lard and butter before but tea cups come in all sizes, which one do I use?  Lol  

18 posts
Sat Jun 29, 24 12:11 PM CST

Oh, I'm so excited we are returning to the 1940's!  I did your 1943 year with you, and started the 1930's year with you, but that was definitely harder!  I have retrieved my 1943 binder and will start working on it this weekend, as well as altering my bathroom and kitchen a bit.  I have missed this time period and look forward to returning to it.  Thanks for the inspiration .. I love having a project! I have been looking for a past post that showed how you arranged your bathroom cabinet to reflect things of the time and I cannot find it.  Can you tell me which article that was?  I can save it then.  Thank you!

Edited Sat Jun 29, 24 1:38 PM by Lynne J
G
307 posts (admin)
Sat Jun 29, 24 1:38 PM CST

Grandma Donna Wrote,  Lynne J, I am very happy to read that you will be returning to the 1940s with us :)  Yes, it feels exciting once again because it just feels right.  I am going to be posting some home work suggestions for everyone to brush up on even if they are not doing the study.  I love having a project too, thank you for commenting.

C
8 posts
Sun Jun 30, 24 2:25 PM CST
Lyn E wrote:

love love love your blog..I am from Australia. been reading it for along time and also rhonda down to earth..I am going to follow along on your 1940s journey..love that era..your words speak to my heart

Love that you are doing 1940, the year that my parents were looking forward to my birth in March of 1941! I just know that you were inspired to start this blog that is such a blessing to so many people both in this country and other countries too. I will follow this as much as I can, though the other family members will never give up the T.V.'s. Last night I listened to the radio show, Kitchen Klatter and tried to wander through the Mass Observation Archive without any luck. blessings to you and all, Carolyn in Florida 


M
9 posts
Sun Jun 30, 24 6:57 PM CST

Hello Grandma Donna, 

Thank you very much for sharing your gentle life. I find it incredibly inspiring to read both your blog entries and also the comments from other like-minded people. 

My husband and I are working hard so I may return to being a full-time housewife in 12 months time.  I so much enjoyed being a homemaker for 15 years when our children were growing up. 

We grew many vegetables, planted fruit trees and kept chickens. I made everything from scratch, made knitted dish cloths and hand-pieced quilts. 

I love the idea very much of returning to 1940. I have a 1930's Queensland Department of Education cookbook that I can cook from. Australians were mostly cooking on wood-fired combustion stoves then, but I can adapt recipes for my electric stove. 

I look forward to following how you go. 

Kind Regards, 

Michelle. 


Edited Sun Jun 30, 24 6:58 PM by Michelle K
S
15 posts
Tue Jul 02, 24 6:27 AM CST

Ooh, Donna, I can feel your energy and enthusiasm, when entering a new time study project. I SO wish I could join you, but my husband would never do so, he is a modern man and don't understand time-travelling. I wish I could borrow your time machine and put him into it, ha. I live "vintage" in my head, I do many things the old ways, my family was poor, so we did live quite old-fashioned, I'm used to it. And now-a-days I ask myself in my head if a housewife from the fifties/forties would have done so, and if so, it is okay? I've dressed forties/fifties for about 15 years now.

I've collected vintage magazines from the thirties, forties and fifties, and even has all from 1960-64, because I got them for a song. They inspire me and I use OldMoney.com to convert prices to learn what was cheap and what was expensive back then. It is interesting to learn what interested ladies back then.

And of other great news - for you - I have convinced dear husband that we should "prep". He has always said we didn't need to, but the radio keeps telling us about a very potential Russian hacker attack that will lock down our electricity and possibly the water too. So I made a list thinking about all I've read on your lovely blog. Now we have lots of bottled drinking water and DH is collecting free 25 litres plastic jerrycans (they have contained handsoap, so the water is great for washing ourselves and do the dishes), we have lots of cans with premade meals, pasta, rice, flour, oatmeal (we will find shelf-stable milk for breakfast), gas for warming and making dinner, we have bought extra wood for heating, I have two small radios and extra batteries, DH has a large battery-booster (for his mc) which can charge our phones (which will only be used for calling for help etc, no fun scrolling), and now I think we only need some thousand Danish kroner in cash, which is also a great advice from the public. What worries me now is that we possibly have to "save" our best friend and son and DiL too, because they don't prep, so DH is already buying a little more canned food every time he shops groceries. I have an old ironing board (love it for all the linen!), and we have placed all our "preps" under it, nice and tidy in groups and smaller things in bags. We certainly hope it will never happen, but it feels so good to be prepared, and then we will just rotate/use all the food and exchange it we new ones over time. If there is something I'm missing on my prepping-list do tell me. You are my vintagey-heroine. ?

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